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Posts Tagged ‘Health’

The Canadian Environmental Health Atlas is an online, open access, visual publication that emphasizes stimulating research and case studies using maps, graphics, videos, infographics and narrative to explain some key concepts of environmental health. Organized by ten themes, the atlas website will include a variety of topics such as asbestos, lead, heat waves, SARS and the Aboriginal Community Well-being index. New topics will be added as they are developed.

Source: CAGlist

The world’s most and least vulnerable areas have been mapped by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Queensland and Stanford University. It illustrates the global distribution of climate stability and is part of a study that appears in the online version of the journal Nature Climate Change.

Source: Science Daily

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Gallon Daily Newsletter

The Daily Edition of Gallon Environment Letter is a policy letter about business and the environment. This daily blog provides commentary on environmental topics of interest to Canadian (and perhaps international) business and has been in operation since March 2011. For more details about the Gallon Environment Letter visit http://www.gallonletter.ca/

Yesterday’s post was how Health Canada is adding to the confusion to the public’s understanding of the toxic substance issues by using the word ‘chemicals’. Follow this link to read more.

Source: Gallondaily

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Researchers from the University of Victoria have produced a second, expanded edition of The British Columbia Atlas of Wellness that details dozens of indicators they believe measure the building blocks of healthy communities.

Source: Vancoucer Sun

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Health Atlases

Tracey Lauriault, PhD candidate in DGES here at Carleton often shares information she has collected with her colleagues. Here is her list of Canadian health-related atlases, maps, and on going digital projects. Access her blog post “Some Health Atlases” here. Thanks Tracey!

Source: datalibre.ca

 

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The CRDCN can answer all of your needs concerning social and population health statistics.

Since 2000, the Canadian Research Data Centre Network (CRDCN), in partnership with Statistics Canada, has transformed quantitative social science research in Canada. In secure computer laboratories on university campuses across Canada, university, government and other approved researchers are able to analyse a vast array of social, economic and health data.

Source: CRDCN web site

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